Tuesday, November 28, 2017

The Gal's 2017 Halloween Frivolities Day 38: White's Character Has Spoken


The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Hi, Charlie.  Welcome to The Gal.  Some of my readers have yet to read your story.  What should they know about you?

Charlie:
Well, I’m still a kid, but it doesn’t feel like it. I’ve been through a lot. Seen some terrible things. Before the world went to shit, I was pretty smart. Enjoyed horror movies and my sister, who was really sick, annoyed me.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What do you believe in?

Charlie:
I believe in death. It’s all I see.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What haunts you?

Charlie:
I’ve had to do some things to protect my sister from the undead that still bother me. They will, in fact, until the day I die. I don’t want to give too much away in case you want to read my story.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Do you have phobias?

Charlie:
I used to, before the dead began rising and walking again. You know, spiders and snakes. Now I only fear the hungry moans of the dead, their shuffling walk.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What's the worst thing that has ever happened to you?

Charlie:
Okay, all I’m going to say about this is that you can’t trust anyone. Not in this world. Not the way things run now. My party and me, we go out of our way to avoid people at all costs whenever we run into them.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Are you lying to yourself about anything?

Charlie:
Yeah, any time I think that things will turn out okay.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What was your childhood like?

Charlie:
My mom and dad liked to party and drink and, you know, do drugs. A lot. My sister, who is twelve and unable to take care of herself because of her illness, was often left in my care. They were never the hitting type, so that was okay. Dale and Merrick were a married couple who lived beside us. Dale helped me out a lot. He got me into watching old horror movies. That was a lot of fun. I also enjoyed reading comics and books back then. It all means shit now, though.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Were your actions the result of freedom of choice or of destiny?

Charlie:
I can only blame destiny. Hardly any of what’s happened was a result of my freedom of choice. I had to react to the world around me, and often very quickly.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
If you could go back in time and change anything, would you?

Charlie:
I would. I would rather live with a drunk and passed out mother and father a thousand times than in this running for your life every day. It’s hell.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What does your name mean to you?

Charlie:
Nothing.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What scars, birthmarks, tattoos, or other identifying marks do you have?  What stories lie behind them?

Charlie:
I hate tattoos. They’re ugly and meaningless to me. I might have gotten one if the world hadn’t died and become resurrected, but now, it’s all pointless. Were food for the dead whether your skin has art on it or not.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What was unique about the setting of your books and how did it enhance or take away from your story?

Charlie:
Well, so far I’ve only been in one of Jason’s books. He says he might write more about my story, but I guess we’ll see.  The setting is unique because it always changed. And then there was that time that me, Grant (the guy who was taking care of us at the time) and my sister nearly froze to death in the middle of winter. Fun times.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
How do you see yourself?

Charlie:
Before the dead started eating the living, I also watched a lot of war movies. In that HBO show, Band of Brothers, there’s a scene where one of the sergeants, or whatever, is trying to get a private to snap out of his fear of death. He says something along the lines of, ‘The reason you’re so afraid is because you still think there’s hope. There is no hope, and you’re already dead.’
            That's how I see myself.  Already dead.  I have to.  It helps me survive.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
How does your enemy see you?

Charlie:
Food.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
How does the author see you?

Charlie:
Jason thinks that I am depressing and completely nihilistic. He’s right. But he also knows the reasons why. I wish he was here with me, then he’d know for certain.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Why do you think the author chose to write about your story?  Do you think they did a good job?

Charlie:
I wouldn’t leave him alone. He was the only one really willing to listen to what I had to say. I think he did a good job translating my experiences to the page.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What do you think about the ending?

Charlie:
I hate the ending because I had to live through it.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Do you think the author portrayed you accurately?  Would you change anything about the story told? Did they miss anything?

Charlie:
I think he made me out pretty well. Maybe a little more optimistic than I really am, but otherwise he nailed it.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Have you read any of your authors' other works?  Any good?

Charlie:
I have. He’s not bad. There’s better. There’s worse.


About the author:
Jason White is a writer and podcaster from the frozen lands of Ontario, Canada.  He has interviewed many writers for The Darkness Dwells Podcast, such as Laird Barron and Ramsey CampbellJohn Langan, and John Palisano.  His novel, The Haunted Country, is available on Amazon, Indigo, Barnes & Noble, and anywhere good fiction is sold online.  He has also published 18 short stories in various magazines and anthologies.


About the book:
Charlie and his sister, Cindy, are going to die.
            Charlie knows this deep inside his bones.
            The World has become a dark and cold place where the dead have risen and taken over the world.  But they're not the worst threat.  With a small number of the living stumbling around to survive, humanity's biggest problem is itself.  Since the end of civilisation, people have tried to kill or enslave the brother and sister.  Everyone who's tried to take care of them since the dead started rising has died.  They've died horribly.
            It only makes sense that Charlie's and Cindy's number will soon be up, as well.  If the dead don't get them, the living surely will.
            They should already be dead.

            Charlie is only fifteen.  His sister, who's severely mentally handicapped, is twelve.  Together they can barely survive other survivors.  Enter Grant, a gun wielding badass who accidentally saves their lives and then wants nothing to do with them.  A reluctant hero, he eventually decides to take the brother and sister under his wing.  Is he enough to take them where they can live free of the ever hungry dead and other, psychotic survivors?  Or will he join the others who've tried to help only to end up food for the dead?

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