Monday, November 13, 2017

The Gal's 2017 Halloween Frivolities Day 23: Quick's Character Has Spoken


After extensive consultation with the staff of the Riverview Mental Health Center, and due to the fact this interview is from a not-for-profit entity meaning that the patient will receive no compensation for completing it, Jeremy's attending therapist has agreed to allow him to participate in said interviews.  All questions were read verbally and the answers were digitally recorded by hospital staff.  The answers presented were transcribed by John Quick, and are exact as Mister Todd presented them.  As was the case with the preparation of the journal for publication, there was no contact between Mister Quick and Mister Todd at any time during the transcription process.


The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Hi, Jeremy.  Thanks for agreeing to sit down with me today.  Some of my readers have yet to read your story.  What should they know about you?

Jeremy Todd:
First, thanks for having me do that. I expected that once my journal got published, I might end up getting attention from CNN or the New York Times or something, but I never considered a book blog. It makes sense I guess, since it was a book.
            As to what everyone should know, I’m just a guy who made some choices that weren’t the smartest in the world, and some people got hurt as a result. I’m not crazy, even though I’ve ended up being branded that way in the press.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What do you believe in?

Jeremy Todd:
I honestly don’t know. I’ve never given it much thought. My friend Roger says I should answer “ghosts” but I’m not sure why. He only laughs when I ask him to explain. I guess maybe second chances, since the judge gave me one by not giving me the death penalty and having me sent here instead. Is that what you’re asking? I’m sorry if I didn’t understand. Sometimes my meds make my brain feel fuzzy.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What haunts you?

Jeremy Todd:
Roger can be such a joker sometimes. He says I should say “him”. But I think I got rid of all my ghosts when I dealt with my high school bullies. Then again, I can still hear them in my head sometimes, so maybe them?

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Do you have any phobias?

Jeremy Todd:
I never thought I did, but the doctors have helped me understand that I’m afraid of crowds, and have some pretty severe social anxiety, even in one on one situations. I also don’t much care for spiders, enclosed spaces, heights, bridges, and clowns.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What's the worst thing that has ever happened to you?

Jeremy Todd:
The absolute worst things are detailed in my journal, but aside from those, I’d have to say the day I found out my parents died. They were tough on me, and I really wish they’d been more understanding about how me and Roger stayed friends even after Chris and his jerk pals confronted us in the school parking lot that night, but they were still my Mom and Dad, and I did love them. It’s still unreal to think of them both going in the same car crash, and when I think how the cops said it was such a freak accident, both front tires coming off and them finding no signs of the lug nuts, I get this strange, fluttering sensation deep down in my belly.
            Weird. The doctor who’s watching over me as I answer these questions just commented how interesting that was and made a note on his pad. I wonder why.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Are you lying to yourself about anything?

Jeremy Todd:
I know Roger would say I lie to myself about everything, but Doctor Hotchkiss always said it wasn’t healthy to lie to yourself about anything, and I try hard to live by that. I miss her. I wish I hadn’t misunderstood what I thought was her flirting. Maybe she’d still be my doctor then….

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What was your childhood like?

Jeremy Todd:
I’d rather not think about my childhood, other than what I’ve already revealed in my journal. The doctors keep telling me I need to talk about it, but I think it makes me worse, not better. Sorry, but I’m declining to answer this one.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Were your actions the result of freedom of choice or of destiny?

Jeremy Todd:
Wow, great question! Interesting, too! I  guess I’d have to go with destiny. If I hadn’t started seeing Doctor Hotchkiss when I did, I wouldn’t have been mentally prepared to go to my class reunion, so I would have never done any of the things I got charged for. It all happened naturally, so I want to say it was destiny, but I did CHOOSE to go see Doctor H, so maybe it’s better to say a little of both? Roger never believed in things like fate or destiny, but secretly, I always did. I just had no idea how they would come into my life, only that it would happen.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
If you could go back in time and change anything, would you?

Jeremy Todd:
Wow. There is so much I would change if I had the chance and the ability. Most recently, I think I would have done things differently when I saw Nikki again at the reunion. Of course, that’s based on what I know now, and maybe it wouldn’t be fair to change it knowing that. Kind of goes back to the fate and destiny thing, doesn’t it? Things happened the way they were destined to. And this way, if something happens and I do get out of this place before I die of old age, I know she’s waiting for me. Roger says she’s not, that I’m only continuing to delude myself, but I know better. She said she forgave me for all those bad things I did, so why wouldn’t she wait for me? Right?

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What does your name mean to you?

Jeremy Todd:
Didn’t Shakespeare say something about “what’s in a name?” I don’t remember. I didn’t pay that much attention in English class. I don’t know, it’s just a name. I’ve had it all my life. I’ve heard better, and I’ve heard worse. It’s just me, I guess.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What scars, birthmarks, tattoos, or other identifying marks do you have?  What stories lie behind them?

Jeremy Todd:
I do have a permanent lump on one side of my head and a long scar down one arm from the fight with Chris and his buddies that night in the parking lot of the school, but that’s about it. Well, I do have a few scars from minor things growing up, but don’t we all?

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What was unique about the setting of your book and how did it enhance or take away from your story?

Jeremy Todd:
What a strange thing to ask. I suppose that since the “setting” was the build-up to and the days of my high school reunion, it enhanced the story, since none of it would have ever happened without my decision to attend it.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
How do you see yourself?

Jeremy Todd:
I hate mirrors. I try not to see myself at all. I’m never alone in my reflection, even when I should be, and that bothers me.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
How does your enemy see you?

Jeremy Todd:
I don’t really have any enemies anymore. The doctors here are all really kind and helpful, even if they don’t fully understand me.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
How does the author see you?

Jeremy Todd:
Author? What author? Oh, that guy whose name is on the cover of my journal, you mean? He just cleaned everything up so my journal could be published. I never really got the chance to talk to him to see what he thought of me. Hopefully, since he dug so deeply into my story, he understands me, and I’d hope maybe he’d like me if we ever met in person, but I really don’t know.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Why do you think the author chose to write about your story?  Do you think they did a good job? 

Jeremy Todd:
I assume he chose to take the job of cleaning up my journal because he was asked to. Then again, I don’t remember signing any contracts allowing him to, but they had me on a lot of meds here, so maybe I just don’t remember.

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
What do you think about the ending?

Jeremy Todd:
Obviously I wish it had turned out better, but it is what it is and I can’t change it. These questions are kind of weird, not at all what I was expecting. I’m really shocked you haven’t asked me about the things I did that got me committed. Just a bunch of stuff about the journal itself. It’s almost like you don’t think I’m real. I promise you, I am, though. <Laughs nervously>

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Do you think the author portrayed you accurately?  Would you change anything about the story told? Did they miss anything?

Jeremy Todd:
Okay, this is a really strange one. He cleaned up a journal, so any portrayals of me came from me. Wait, do you seriously think I’m not real? I am, I really mean that. I’m real. I’m real. DAMMIT, I AM REAL!

The Gal in the Blue Mask:
Have you read any of your authors' other works?  Any good?

Jeremy Todd:
<This is Doctor Lawrence Bailey of the Riverview Mental Health Center. I apologize, but Jeremy has become a bit too distraught to complete this final question. He has been sedated and returned to his room. Again, I apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.>




About the author:
John Quick has been reading and writing scary and disturbing stuff for as long as he can remember, and has only recently begun releasing some of his creations upon the world.
            His debut novel, Consequences, is available now in paperback or digital format.  At the end of 2016, he published a small short story collection, called Three Shots & a Chaser, with a unique idea of wrapping those stories around a main story.  It's available in digital or print formats as well.  He's excited to have now released his next novel, The Journal of Jeremy Todd, with Sinister Grin Press.  He lives in Middle Tennessee with his wife, two kids, and four dogs that think they're kids.
            When he's not hard at work on his next novel, you can find him online at his blog, Facebook, and Twitter.
            You can find his work at his Amazon Author Page.


About the book:
"I've had some issues.  That I won't deny.  But am I crazy?  I suppose that's going to be up to you to figure out.
            This is what happened to mea round the time of my high school reunion.  This is what I did, and why I did it.  The story not only of that reunion and the events surrounding it, the ones you've probably read about in the papers, but about the things that happened during high school that made it necessary for things to play out the way they did.  This is what happened to me, and to all those kids who thought I was simply a target in school.  This is the true story of what they did to me, and what I did to them in return.
            Once you've read my tale, I'm sure you'll agree that I'm not crazy.
            And who cares what the judge thought, anyway?"


THE JOURNAL OF JEREMY TODD, found by Riverview Mental Hospital staff, has now been made public.

No comments: